Posts Tagged ‘hershey’

Rollin’ Rolos

Thursday, January 28th, 2010 by Becca Droz
This is a rare Rolo label from the 1970's and it shows the manufacturer as being Mackintosh which was the manufacturer in England

This is a rare Rolo label from the 1970′s and it shows the manufacturer as being Mackintosh which was the manufacturer in England

Sharability: 3

Denture Danger: 8

Convenience: 5

Novelty: 10

Overall: 9

1937 isn’t just the year that U.S. Steel raised workers’ wages to $5 a day, or just the year that the first quadruplets finished college, or just the year that China declared war on Japan. 1937 is the year that the Rolo candy was introduced.

Nestlé Rowntree manufactured this delicious candy, and Nestlé continues to produce Rolos everywhere except in the United States. Here in America, we have accredited The Hershey Company with the Rolo candy since 1969.

Rich milk chocolate surrounding a soft, chewy caramel filling; this candy is classic, this candy is delicious, and this candy is rolly. The most well known Rolo slogan, “Do you love anyone enough to give them your last Rolo?” is quite appropriate because the Rolos used to come with 11 in every package leaving 10 for you, but in 1995 Rolos reduced the number of candies in each package to 10 making giving up one much more difficult.

They also advertise the candies as rollable, you can roll them to your friend, you can roll them to your mom, or you can roll them to me.

A few fun facts about the vintage Rolo label:

This wrapper is interesting as it shows the “Mackintosh’s” brand above the candy name

Originally, Rolo’s were from the United Kingdom and it wasn’t until the early 1980’s, when Hershey acquired the brand, that the Mackintosh name would be removed from the label.

Also, if you look carefully, you will see that NECCO is on the label and that is because the New England Confectionary Company was the original distributor and manufacturer of Rolo’s in the United States.

 

Sources:

  • http://www.hersheys.com/products/details/rolo.asp
  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rolo
  •  http://www.brainyhistory.com/years/1937.html
  • http://www.independent.co.uk/news/nestle-keeps-mum-as-last-rolo-goes-missing-1526432.html

Choo Choo Charlie says Love my Good & Plenty!

Wednesday, January 6th, 2010 by Becca Droz

 

Vintage Good and Plenty Advertisement Circa 1960's

Vintage Good and Plenty Advertisement Circa 1960′s

Sharability: 7

Denture Danger: 6

Convenience: 8

Novelty: 9

Overall: 9

The Quaker City Confectionary Company first produced the Good & Plenty candy in 1893 and believe it or not it is the oldest branded candy in the United States.

Over the years the company has changed hands from Quaker City, to Warner-Lambert, to Leaf Candy Company, to Beatrice Foods, to the current manufacturer, Hershey.

There was much controversy over the naming of this candy, but eventually the Quaker City Confectionary Company settled with Good & Plenty as the name instead of the less catchy Bad & Scarce.

The name is sometimes misleading because though it might imply that there are plenty to go around, once you give them away you realize that there aren’t enough for you.

Over 50 years after the candy was first produced, the company came up with a catchy cartoon character for marketing the candy. Choo Choo Charlie quickly became popular to kids all over America (including my mom) with his theme song:

Once upon a time there was an engineer
Choo Choo Charlie was his name, we hear.
He had an engine and he sure had fun
He used Good & Plenty candy to make his train run.
Charlie says “Love my Good & Plenty!”
Charlie says “Really rings my bell!”
Charlie says “Love my Good & Plenty!”
Don’t know any other candy that I love so well!

The only kind of person that doesn’t like the Good & Plenty candy is the kind of person who doesn’t like the black licorice flavor to begin with. If you like black licorice then this candy is great. The chewy licorice cylinder is covered in a hard candy shell, and the best part is that the ratio of candy to licorice is just right.

The question lies in the color. Does the white one have a different flavor than the pink one? I have personally done field research to answer this question, as I’m sure most of you have done as well. I have found that the results concur with my hypothesis, and friends, I’m pleased to inform you that the answer is, (SPOILER ALERT) no. So you can all stop fighting over the last pink one.

Sources:

  • http://www.hersheys.com/products/details/goodandplenty.asp
  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Good_&_Plenty

Mounds and Almond Joy, Sisters for Life

Monday, October 19th, 2009 by Becca Droz
A vintage Almond Joy and Mounds Advertisement

A vintage Almond Joy and Mounds Advertisement

Sharability: 5

Denture Danger: 4

Convenience: 5

Novelty: 8

Overall: 7

When New Years would come around and my bag of Halloween candy was at it’s end there would always be a couple Mounds and Almond Joy sitting at the bottom of my pillowcase bag. I don’t know why, because they really aren’t bad candies, but the coconut just didn’t satisfy my childhood taste buds the way Reese’s and Kit Kats did. My dad was always happy to put me out of my misery and eat the Mounds and Almond Joy for me.

Though I’m not usually a huge dark chocolate fan, it works well with the sweet coconut flavor. And I actually think I prefer it to the milk chocolate Almond Joy. The dark chocolate pulls away from the extremely sweet coconut flavor and the milk chocolate just adds to the sweetness, which is where the almond comes in.

It adds another twist to the flavor and does its job to dull down the sweetness. So both are good in their own unique way, it just depends if you are feeling like a nut or not.

Mounds and Almond Joy are sister Hershey’s products originally produced by the Peter Paul Company. The Peter Paul name is still printed on the candies’ wrappers even though the company itself no long exits. Peter Paul Halajian and some other investors created the Peter Paul Candy Company in 1919. The company originally sold a variety of candies, but because of sugar shortages during WWII they decided to focus on the production of the Mounds bar, which was created in 1920.

In 1946, Almond Joy replaced a candy called the Dream Bar, which was filled with coconut and diced almonds. A famous jingle of the 1970s ad campaign for the sister candies sang, “Sometimes you feel like a nut, sometimes you don’t.”

If you are feeling like a milk chocolatey nut, grab an Almond Joy, and if you’re feeling more sophisticated, go for the dark chocolate, nutless Mounds. If you want to take the risk with the youngsters on Halloween night, go for it, at least you know the parents will be happy.

Ah, the Convenience of Individually Wrapped Twizzlers

Thursday, September 24th, 2009 by Becca Droz
Perfect for pocket, purse or gift, Individually Wrapped Twizzlers fit the bill

Perfect for pocket, purse or gift, Individually Wrapped Twizzlers fit the bill

Sharability: 10

Denture Danger: 6

Convenience: 10

Novelty: 7

Overall: 10

We all know about Twizzlers, at least we all should. Young and Smylie (Y&S) Company manufactures this delicious strawberry licorice candy. Y&S was established in 1845 and was bought by Hershey Foods in 1977.

Y&S originally introduced Twizzlers in 1845 as black licorice, but as of 1990 Twizzlers are produced in strawberry, chocolate, cherry, and watermelon in varying shapes and sizes.

 Now, you can find little nibs licorice, which are bite size pieces, you can find Pull ‘n’ Peel or rainbow Twizzlers, and you can always get the regular Twizzlers that you get at the concession stand at the movies.

But, one kind of Twizzler you can’t find everywhere is the individually wrapped Twizzler.

Individually wrapped Twizzlers are a great table candy for parties–– even Bar Mitzvah parties because this is a Kosher candy–– especially if you worry about people touching more than they take, and at this time of year preventing the spread of the swine.

What these are best for though is grabbing when you are on the go. Instead of buying a whole pack where you end up eating every Twizzler whether or not you want to, you can limit your intake by eating one now, and one in a little bit, and saving one for later… quite convenient if you ask me. 

Fun Fact: The longest licorice twist ever made was recorded in the Guinness Book of World Records on July 19, 1998 at 1,200 feet and 100 pounds.