Archive for the ‘Candy Bar Reviews’ Category

Krackel: The old school crunch in a new school size

Friday, August 15th, 2014 by Becca Droz

 

krackel-bar-2

“Krackel is dope, it has an old school kind of crunch.”

Classroom/Movie Munchability: 8

Melt Measure: 8

Novelty: 6

Sharability: 7

It might not be the simplest candy to spell correctly, but this Hershey’s bar shows simplicity with style. It is the classic milk chocolate bar with a little crisped rice crunch to keep you paying attention.

When Krackels was originally introduced in 1938 as a full size candy bar, it had almonds and crisped rice in the formula. Soon after, peanuts were added to the party. In 1941, while war was at large on the other side of the globe, Krackel became a crisped rice, and crisped rice only, chocolate bar. In the late 90s, Krackel availability shrunk, in physical size. For almost 20 years, the Krackel bar has only been available in the miniature fun size bar, and now, the bar the people have been asking for is back. Catch up with the Krackel full size! It’s a blast from the past, the old school krunch in its old school/new school size!

Sources:

http://chocolate.wikia.com/wiki/Krackel

The Zero Bar is far from a Zero!

Thursday, July 15th, 2010 by Jon Prince
Vintage Zero Bar Wrapper

The Zero Bar is a candy with a long history as it was first introduced in the 1930's by Hollywood Candy Company but it now owned by Hershey Foods. This wrapper , circa early 1930's, is very rare as it shows a Polar Bear!

The Zero Bar is not your average candy bar as it is a candy with a history spanning over 70 years!

It was first introduced in the 1920′s by the now defunct Hollywood Brands Candy Company and is now owned by Hershey Foods although this transition took place over many years and included many owners in between.

 The candy bar is unique in that it consists of a delicious amalgamation of almonds, peanuts and caramel nougat covered, or shall we say , drenched, with delicious white fudge. This was even more controversial upon its release as most candy bars then, as now, are coated in milk chocolate.

As per the name, this has been the subject of candy lore as it was not touted as a reduced calorie candy bar – hence the name Zero – but rather because the white coating was supposed to give the impression of snow and, metaphorically speaking, “cool as zero degrees”

The original wrapper had a Polar Bear on it and upon it’s initial release,  was called Double Zero. It wasn’t until 1934 that it formally became known as the Zero Bar

The original Zero Bars were distributed in the summer as fudge has a much higher melting point than milk chocolate and, as there wasn’t air conditioning readily available when the bar was first released; retailers stored this in their refrigerators.

Yes, this candy bar like others will melt if exposed to high temperatures but there is something intriguing about this bar that makes it endure as a classic if only because it is delicious and holds true to it’s original formula and because it is over 70 years old!

PS: The vintage Zero Bar wrapper pictured above is VERY rare as it shows the Polar Bear!  This is circa early 1930′s

Milky Way Simply Caramel offers a totally Caramel experience

Tuesday, July 13th, 2010 by Jon Prince
Milky Way Simply Caramel Candy Bar offers a truly Caramel experience

In 1923, the first chocolate candy bar with a filled center was introduced and it was called Milky Way. In 2010, this iconic candy bar has a new relative called Milky Way Simply Caramel which is a great tasting candy bar aimed at lovers of Caramel Candies...

Did you know that the first chocolate bar with a filled center was the beloved Milky Way bar, made by Mars, which was created by Frank Mars in 1923. However consistent this candy bar has remained for over 87 years, it is important to note that note all Milky Way bars are created equal. 

The Milky Way bar that is offered in the United States is a delicious amalgamation  of chocolate malt nougat topped with caramel and covered with rich milk chocolate BUT the Milky Way Bar offered on “distant shores” is not topped with caramel and is therefore similar to the American 3 Musketeers.

Confused? The Milky Ways sold in the United States is similar in taste to the Mars Bar sold in Europe.

Just when you think that you understand the subtle differences, Mars throws us a challenge with their new and delicious Milky Way Simply Caramel.

Unlike its siblings, this is identical throughout the world and, according to Masterfoods USA, it is “for consumers seeking a totally caramel experience” and is “tempting with rich, creamy caramel surrounded by real milk chocolate.”

It is a delicious new candy bar and there are few companies that can take a tried and tested classic and make it better as Masterfoods USA has done with Milky Way Simply Caramel

Dark Chocolate Clark Bars – A history of a classic candy bar revisted!

Friday, July 9th, 2010 by Jon Prince
A vintage Clark Bar Advertisement made long before there was a Dark Chocolate version

Clark Bars have a unique place in Pittsburgh history and were invented in McKeesport where our candy warehouse has been located since 1927! The new Dark Chocolate Clark Bar is a truly delicious twist on an old classic!

The former pride of Pittsburgh and McKeesport , the beloved Clark Bar, has just released a  All Natural Dark Chocolate version which is truly a unique twist on one of the best tasting candy bars available

In case you are not familiar with Clark Bars, they are a candy bar consisting of a honeycomb peanut butter crisp center with a rich milk chocolate covering.

The signature item of one of the country’s largest candy empires started in 1891 with a small operation run by young entrepreneur David L. Clark located in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Within a few years, he made enough money to open a modest factory in McKeesport which is where CandyFavorites has been located since we opened our candy filled warehouse in 1927 ( actually it was in 1926 but we didn’t incorporate until a year later)

 By 1911, the candy had become so popular that the company was forced to relocate, and Mr. Clark purchased a large building from a cracker manufacturer. 

 In the 1920′s, when the company was making approximately one hundred and fifty (150) different types of candy and gum, Mr. Clark decided to create a separate company for the gum-making business, thinking that the candy and gum operations would be more successful if run separately.

 He opened the Clark Brothers Chewing Gum Co. across the street from his candy factory and his family continued to run the business until 1955.  The company remained a Pittsburgh mainstay for several decades but ran into financial difficulties in the 90s and the brand was rescued by the New England Confectionary Company known to candy lovers as NECCO.

In 2010, the formula was changed for Clark Bars and now includes All Natural Ingredients.  The Dark Chocolate version of the Clark Bar is one of the few examples of a formula being improved and we think that this variation is so delicious that, someday, it too will become a classic!

Take A Moment to Enjoy Silky Smooth Dove Dark Chocolate

Wednesday, June 2nd, 2010 by Becca Droz
Take A Moment to Enjoy Dove Silky Smooth Dark Chocolate

Take A Moment to Enjoy Dove Silky Smooth Dark Chocolate

Sharability: 6

Denture Danger: 4

Convenience: 5

Novelty: 6

Overall: 10

If you think of yourself as someone who just doesn’t do dark chocolate, one of those people who thinks dark chocolate is just too bitter or too sophisticated or not sweet enough or not smooth enough, think again. If you think that you fit at least slightly under that description then I would argue that you have not tried Dove’s smooth dark chocolate.

This candy bar of Dove chocolate is! It melts smoothly in your mouth leaving you craving more, but be careful because it does follow the trend of most candies in that less is more. As long as the candy bar comes perforated to break into separate chunks you might as well make someone’s day silky smooth with the generous offer.

Dove from the Mars company makes sure that its chocolate is not too sweet or too bitter, but is as delectable as it is by making sure the perfect ratio of chocolate liquor and cocoa butter is put in the chocolate.

I can just imagine one of those society driven people bustling through a stressful day of business plans and kids’ arrangements, or a teenager after a long day at school, or backpackers after a long hike, or a young child after a day, or a grandparent after a sports event being interrupted by a friend or a stranger and asked if they want a piece of Dove’s silky smooth dark chocolate.

I can imagine they take it as they would take most pieces of chocolate, with mild excitement and mild thanks, thinking it’s going to be equally as good as the bag of M&Ms they gobbled down an hour ago but upon putting this piece of chocolate in their mouth all of the worries and problems, all thoughts of past and future drift away into nothingness (which is really what they were to begin with) and all that is left is a moment of chocolate bliss where the entire body is focusing on the magical taste of silky smooth dark chocolate nowness, every muscle in the body is trying to conserve the taste as it melts away, until, there it was, a moment of presence brought to you by Dove’s silky smooth dark chocolate.

Sources:

http://www.dovechocolate.com/chocolate.html

The Somewhat Healthy Side of Candy: Raisinets

Monday, April 12th, 2010 by Becca Droz
A rare box of Raisinets circa 1960

Raisinets have been around for quite some time and this box of chocolate covered raisins is from the late 1960's when the brand was owned by Ward Candy Company

Sharability: 8

Denture Danger: 6

Convenience: 7

Novelty: 9

Overall: 9

 California raisins, Nestlé milk chocolate, melty, chewy, sweet, fruity, Raisinets are a classic concession candy.

They are great for movies because you can make them last a long time by chewing and enjoying each one individually (and even letting some of your friends munch down a couple), and they are a silent candy and therefore won’t distract you from the movie and won’t distract your neighbors either.

Nestlé wants you to know that Raisinets are not just for movies anymore and I would agree, I ate a bag just for fun and it was great.

 The Blumenthal Chocolate Company originally introduced Raisinets in 1927; Nestlé took it over in 1984. Today you can check out the Raisinets channel on youtube and watch silly videos of cartoon Raisins pretending to be real people… mildly entertaining.

There’s a lot of ways to catch some rays, but none like Raisenets.

Heath Bar, Not Quite a Health Bar

Tuesday, April 6th, 2010 by Becca Droz
A vintage Heath Bar Advertisement from the 1960's

A rare vintage Heath Bar Wrapper from the 1960's when the candy was being distributed by the now defunct CB Heath & Sons in Illinois

Sharability: 2

Denture Danger: 8

Convenience: 6

Novelty: 8

Overall: 9

Heath bar… a delightfully sweet and cruncharific candy bar. Super sweet English toffee with a hint of almonds coated in milk chocolate for the candy that will demand you to finish it.

Toffee is toffee and toffee will get stuck in your teeth, but it won’t stop you from enjoying every sugary mouth watering bite of this thin candy bar.

In 1914 L.S. Heath opened a confectionary store in Illinois. His sons, Bayard and Everett Heath, ran the store and perfected the Heath toffee bar recipe in 1928; by 1932 the bar was on the market. The Heath bar was made fully by hand for ten years until the company modernized its plant.

The Heath brothers came up with a great marketing scheme in which they made the candy bar available for delivery via Heath dairy trucks along with milk and cottage cheese. This marketing idea must have worked better than the one that marketed the bar as healthy: “Heath for better health!”

I just don’t think there is and chocolate covered toffee bar out there that can actually be considered healthy. The Heath bar was another candy bar that the government had distributed to the military during World War II. Leaf North American Confectionary bought Heath in 1989 and Hershey took that over in 1996.

Healthy or not healthy, a Heathy is a great choice.

Munchin’ on Military M&Ms and Peanut M&Ms

Thursday, April 1st, 2010 by Becca Droz
An M&M's Candy ad from the 1970's

We stumbled upon this retro candy advertisement for M&M's from the 1970's.

Sharability: 8

Denture Danger: 4

Convenience: 7

Novelty: 9

Overall: 9

Mars company manufactures the M&M, which is milk chocolate, covered in a hard candy shell, but you know that. What you might not know is where the idea for M&Ms originated.

During the Spanish Civil War in the 1930s Forrest Mars Sr. saw soldiers eating chocolate pellets surrounded by a hard shell as to prevent them from melting. Mars took this genius idea and patented his own version in 1941.

 During World War II M&Ms were sold exclusively to the military. In 1954, the slogan that Elizabeth Granberry Hill Mckean wrote was trademarked, fitting well with the original purpose of the candy, “The milk chocolate that melts in your mouth, not in your hand.”

In terms of the name of the candy, one M comes from Forrest Mars Sr., the founder of the Mars Company, and one comes from Bruce Murrie, the son of William Murrie, the former Hershey’s president. Murrie had 20% interest in the candy, which made it possible for Mars to make the M&Ms with Hershey’s chocolate, a bit ironic, eh?

Peanut M&Ms have more substance to them and are more fun because you can either munch on them with the chocolate and peanut together or eat them separately. You can melt the chocolate away and then chew down the peanut or you can carefully separate the peanut from the chocolate in your mouth, either way they can keep you occupied if you are watching a boring movie.

M&Ms now come in almost every color you can imagine, but brown, green, yellow, orange, red, and blue are most common.

Some fun facts about M&Ms are that the m on the front of the M&M was printed in black until 1954 and also, M&Ms have been up in space to demonstrate antigravity. Whether you are eating them in space or here on Earth, this classic candy won’t disappoint.

3 Musketeers: ‘Whipped Up, Fluffy, Chocolate on Chocolate Taste’ and 75th Anniversary 3 Musketeers Mint

Monday, February 8th, 2010 by Becca Droz
A 3 Musketeers Wrapper from the 1970's when candy bars were still $.20

A 3 Musketeers Wrapper from the 1970′s when candy bars were still $.20

Sharabilty: 6

Denture Danger: 4

Convenience: 5

Novelty: 8

Overall: 9

 There were a number of years in which I called 3 Musketeers my favorite candy and it isn’t a mystery why. The ‘whipped up’, fluffy chocolate in the center of the milk chocolate shell may look like wet cat food but the taste, consistency, and texture are in a league of their owns.

In August 2007,  3 Musketeers came out with the 75th anniversary addition of the candy, The 3 Musketeers mint with dark chocolate. This version has a filling of a similar texture and consistency as the whipped, fluffy chocolate, but its taste matches right up with that of the filling of a York peppermint patty.

In fact the 3 Musketeers mint is basically a peppermint patty in bar form. It also differs from the normal 3 musketeers in that it comes in two separate bars instead of one full size bar, which makes sharing a little easier.

In 1932 3 Musketeers was the third brand to be produced by the Mars Company. It originally had 3 small bars inside the package—hence the name—with three different flavors, vanilla, strawberry, and chocolate.

This version of the bar stopped being manufactured, most likely because of the rising costs and taxes on sugar during wartime. So the most popular of the three, chocolate, took over the package.

Fun Fact: The 3 Musketeers bar is known as Milky Way outside of the U.S. and Canada (we have our own Milky Way).

Sources:

http://www.3musketeers.com/index.shtml

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/3_Musketeers_%28confectionery%29

Cruisin’ Down Crunchy 5th Avenue

Friday, February 5th, 2010 by Becca Droz
Did you know that the Hershey 5th Bar was invented by William Luden who invented Ludens Cough Drops

Did you know that the Hershey 5th Bar was invented by William Luden who invented Ludens Cough Drops

Sharability: 3

Denture Danger: 6

Convenience: 5

Novelty: 8

Overall: 9

NECCO created the Clark Bar, Nestlé created the Butterfinger, and Hershey’s didn’t want to be left out. Don’t fear because Hershey has its own chocolate covered crunchy peanut butter candy bar, the 5th Avenue bar.

I can’t say it is better or worse than the Clark Bar or Butterfinger, because it is basically the same. It’s delicious, it’s flakey, it will get stuck in your teeth, and it will leave chocolate on your fingers, but it won’t disappoint.

William H. Luden started his candy business in 1879. He manufactured hard candies and soft candies, marshmallow products, and chocolates. He created the well-known Luden’s cough drops as well.

In 1936 Luden introduced the 5th Avenue candy bar. During WWII the cough drops and 5th Avenue bar had greater production rates because they were used by the military. Until Hershey’s acquired Luden’s in 1987, the 5th Avenue bar had two chocolate-coated almond halves on top.

The 5th Avenue bar is great for creating one of those stories where you use the candy bar (or just the wrapper) as a word in the story. I know Pittsburgh has a 5th Avenue, and I’m sure most cities have one, too. Write a story with it, share it, or gobble it up, but whatever you do with it, make sure you enjoy it!

Fun Fact: The 5th Avenue bar appeared in the Seinfeld episode The Dealership and in the 1994 movie, Stargate.

Sources:

  • http://www.hersheys.com/products/details/fifthavenue.asp
  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/5th_Avenue_(candy)