Archive for the ‘Candy Bar Reviews’ Category

Rollin’ Rolos

Thursday, January 28th, 2010 by Becca Droz
This is a rare Rolo label from the 1970's and it shows the manufacturer as being Mackintosh which was the manufacturer in England

This is a rare Rolo label from the 1970′s and it shows the manufacturer as being Mackintosh which was the manufacturer in England

Sharability: 3

Denture Danger: 8

Convenience: 5

Novelty: 10

Overall: 9

1937 isn’t just the year that U.S. Steel raised workers’ wages to $5 a day, or just the year that the first quadruplets finished college, or just the year that China declared war on Japan. 1937 is the year that the Rolo candy was introduced.

Nestlé Rowntree manufactured this delicious candy, and Nestlé continues to produce Rolos everywhere except in the United States. Here in America, we have accredited The Hershey Company with the Rolo candy since 1969.

Rich milk chocolate surrounding a soft, chewy caramel filling; this candy is classic, this candy is delicious, and this candy is rolly. The most well known Rolo slogan, “Do you love anyone enough to give them your last Rolo?” is quite appropriate because the Rolos used to come with 11 in every package leaving 10 for you, but in 1995 Rolos reduced the number of candies in each package to 10 making giving up one much more difficult.

They also advertise the candies as rollable, you can roll them to your friend, you can roll them to your mom, or you can roll them to me.

A few fun facts about the vintage Rolo label:

This wrapper is interesting as it shows the “Mackintosh’s” brand above the candy name

Originally, Rolo’s were from the United Kingdom and it wasn’t until the early 1980’s, when Hershey acquired the brand, that the Mackintosh name would be removed from the label.

Also, if you look carefully, you will see that NECCO is on the label and that is because the New England Confectionary Company was the original distributor and manufacturer of Rolo’s in the United States.

 

Sources:

  • http://www.hersheys.com/products/details/rolo.asp
  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rolo
  •  http://www.brainyhistory.com/years/1937.html
  • http://www.independent.co.uk/news/nestle-keeps-mum-as-last-rolo-goes-missing-1526432.html

The Mallo Cup Sets the Bar For Cup Candies

Friday, January 22nd, 2010 by Becca Droz
A retro Mallo Cup wrapper from the 1970's

A retro Mallo Cup wrapper from the 1970′s

Sharability: 4

Denture Danger: 7

Convenience: 4

Novelty: 10

Overall: 8

The Reese’s Cup might taste better (and it might not, it’s all a matter of opinion), but it doesn’t have the novelty factor of being the first ever cup candy made in the United States. The Mallo Cup takes the trophy for this honor.

The whipped cream center has the consistency of melty marshmallow and is covered in a chocolate coconuty cup shell. The taste is odd at first but quickly grows on you and if you don’t like it, I’m sure someone at the lunch table will be happy to relieve you of the burden of eating the second cup.

Boyer Brothers, Inc. founded in 1936 in Altoona, PA is the company that manufactures these gloop filled cups. They used to manufacture many different kinds of cup candies including a s’mores cup and a peanut butter marshmallow cup, but all of these came after the original Mallo. Now, the only cups they manufacture are the peanut butter cup (the standing competitor of the Reese’s cup), the smoothie cup which is a peanut butter butterscotch cup, and of course, the Mallo.

Fun facts:
-The Boyer Plant makes over 2 million cups every day. If you were to line these cups up side by side they would cover 58 miles.
- It takes 20 tons of the Mallo filling to fill 2,000,000 Mallo Cups.

Sources:

http://www.boyercandies.com/

Junior Mints: It’s chocolate, It’s Peppermint—It’s Delicious!

Tuesday, January 19th, 2010 by Becca Droz
A vintage Junior Mints box from the early 1970's when Junior Mints were still being produced by Nabisco

A vintage Junior Mints box from the early 1970′s when Junior Mints were still being produced by Nabisco

Sharability: 1

Denture Danger: 4

Convenience: 4

Novelty: 7

Overall: 10

The Junior Mint name originated from a collection of stories by Sally Benson that were published in the New York Times, titled Junior Miss. The Junior Miss stories influenced the idea for a play called Junior Miss and the play was featured on Broadway from 1941 to 1943.

This play is where James Welch found the influence for the name of his candy that he first marketed in 1949. The Junior Miss play became a movie and this made the  Junior Mints quite successful at movie concession stands.

Nabisco acquired the James O. Welch Company in 1963, who then sold it to Warner-Lambert Company, which was then bought in 1993 by Tootsie Roll who currently manufactures the 15 million mints that are produced daily.

Junior Mints are popular among many, including my mom. When buying Junior Mints I always have to take caution when eating them around my mom because she will be sure to steal at least half the box.

Junior Mints are definitely a candy that I would label as too good to share. Putting it in your mouth you can crush the soft candy with your tongue and taste the dark chocolate melt onto your tongue as the smooth minty sweetness seeps out onto your taste buds. (You can’t tell me that your mouth isn’t watering right now).

The Junior Mint was featured on the sitcom, and one of my favorite shows, Seinfeld, on the episode titled, The Junior Mint. Kramer and Jerry are observing a splenectomy surgery from a viewing area above. Kramer offers Jerry a Junior Mint and Jerry refuses. Kramer insists for the reason that he later explains as, “Who is gonna turn down a Junior Mint? It’s chocolate, it’s peppermint—it’s delicious!” While trying to force Jerry to take the mint, it slips out of Kramers hand and falls into the patient’s body without any of the doctors noticing.

Though Junior Mints are extremely tasty, one thing you might not want to know about them is that they are not only not vegan, but they are not vegetarian either. The gelatin that makes up the peppermint filling is made from boiling animal hides and animal bones. And boy do those boiled animal hides taste delicious! In the UK and Canada, however, the gelatin is replaced by agar making the mints vegetarian and vegan.

I am a vegetarian and I did eat the Junior Mints. I was not aware that they were not compatible with my vegetarian diet, but even now that I do know, unless there were to be chunks of meat in the filling, I would eat another box right now.

Sources:

  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Junior_Mints
  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sally_Benson
  • http://www.seinfeldscripts.com/TheJuniorMints.htm
  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Junior_Mint

Goldenbergs Peanut Chews – an iconic classic since 1917

Wednesday, January 13th, 2010 by Becca Droz
Goldenbergs Peanut Chews have been an iconic candy favorite since 1917

Goldenbergs Peanut Chews have been an iconic candy favorite since 1917

Sharability: 8

Denture Danger: 7

Convenience: 6

Novelty: 9

Overall: 8

Though the name of the candy is Peanut Chews, I couldn’t help but think it was lying based o the picture on the wrapper. To me, it looked like solid chocolate filled with peanuts and I couldn’t fathom how that was going to be chewy.

The wrapper doesn’t say there is caramel in the inside; it just says “Bite-size chewy pieces loaded with peanuts!” So when I bit into the caramel-like substance that was filled with peanuts and covered in chocolate I wondered why they didn’t mention that on the wrapper.

Maybe it isn’t caramel. Maybe it is some chemical substance that is a cheap substitute for the “creamy” caramel that, oh so many candies love to rave about. But don’t let me put ideas in your head.

The truth is that the caramel-like substance is molasses, which is a syrupy sugar. The Peanut Chews are manufactured by Just Born, which also makes America’s favorite Easter candy, Peeps. I only had the honor of tasting the ‘milk chocolatey’ flavor, though I do know that this candy comes in original dark chocolate as well. The bar is not so much a bar, but many bars, six to be exact. Six little fun size candies, making sharing easy.

Romanian immigrant, David Goldenberg, founded the Goldenberg Candy Company in 1890. This company first introduced the Peanut Chews in 1917. This high protein and high energy bar was originally developed as a ration bar for the U.S. military in World War I. The company went through the hands of many Goldenbergs who all did their part in making the candy what it is today.

In the 1930s Harry Goldenberg initiated the conversion from the bite size bars to a full bar with bite size pieces. Just Born accumulated the Peanut Chews in 2003. This one is a fun vintage candy, and it’s vegan too!

Sources:

  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peanut_Chews
  • http://www.justborn.com/peanut-chews/

The Solo: Hershey’s Originial, The Duet: Hershey’s Almond, and the Orchestra: Hershey’s Symphony

Friday, December 18th, 2009 by Becca Droz
Hershey's provides many options to create a true chocolate symphony

Hershey’s provides many options to create a true chocolate symphony

Sharability: 4

Denture Danger: 4

Convenience: 5

Novelty: 10

Overall: 10

Milton Hershey, Lancaster Pennsylvania, 1894. This is where it all went down. Originally, Milton Hershey wanted to create a sweet chocolate to cover his caramels, so he created the Hershey Chocolate Company. This was a time when only the wealthy could afford to enjoy the luxury of chocolate and Hershey wanted to change that. He set out to create a chocolate that everyone could afford. He had access to large amounts of fresh milk by locating his operation was in the center of dairy country and with the mass production of the chocolate he was able to create the inexpensive chocolate. In 1900 the famous milk chocolate bar was created. And eight years later the solo became a duet with the almond Hershey’s.

It’s been 100 years and Hershey’s is still an American favorite. It has almost fourteen thousand employees exporting to 90 countries.

The original Hershey’s milk chocolate bar is no doubt an amazing candy by itself, but I’ve always associated the bar with s’mores. For those of you who have been living in a box for your whole life, a s’more is a sandwich with a marshmallow (usually roasted over a fire) and chocolate in between two squares of graham crackers. This sticky, melty mess is one of the most delicious taste treats ever invented by man. (It is also delicious if you spread peanut butter over the graham crackers).

The Hershey’s with almonds was my grandma’s favorite candy. She didn’t have much of an explanation for it besides that it was that delicious Hershey’s milk chocolate with a crunch.

Then there’s the Hershey’s symphony bar. I’m only assuming it was named after the Hershey Symphony Orchestra in Pennsylvania. The different flavors of almonds, toffee, and chocolate create for a symphony of tastes. They both add an extra crunch while the toffee adds a significant sweetness, which drown out the almond. I think I prefer the solo of the original Hershey’s and even the duet of the Hershey almonds over the symphony; not to say it isn’t delicious.
www.hersheys.com

Nuts for Nuts: Mr. Peanut’s Planters Peanut Bar

Friday, December 4th, 2009 by Becca Droz
If you feel like you are going "nuts", why not try Planters Original Peanut Bar...

If you feel like you are going “nuts”, why not try Planters Original Peanut Bar…

Sharability: 7

Denture Danger: 4

Convenience: 6

Novelty: 7

Overall: 7

The Planters Peanut Bar is definitely not your typical candy bar. It is basically a bunch of peanuts all stuck together by hardened sugar, corn syrup, and salt. It creates for an extra crunchy candy with the simple taste of sweet peanuts. This candy is brittle and is bound to break into many pieces, which makes sharing easier.

Amedeo Obici and his business partner (and future brother-in-law) Mario Peruzzi founded the Planters peanut company in 1906 in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania.

Among the corporations in America, the Planter’s trademark, Mr. Peanut is one of the most recognizable. Mr. Peanut originated from a sketch that a 13-year-old boy submitted to a Planters brand icon contest in 1916. He submitted the peanut character while a commercial artist later added the cane, white gloves, top hat, and monocle. You can find Mr. Peanut on the wrapper of the Planters Peanut Bar.

The Planters Peanut Bar was introduced in the 1930s but was originally called the Planters Jumbo Block. This candy isn’t anything super special but it pleases the taste buds with its barely embellished sweet peanut flavor.

Sources:

  • http://www.planters.com/history.aspx
  • http://www.candyfavorites.com/Planters-Peanut-Bar-pr-225.html

Nuts for Nuts: Payday Bar

Monday, November 30th, 2009 by Becca Droz
Sweet Caramel + Tons of Peanuts = Payday!

Sweet Caramel + Tons of Peanuts = Payday!

Sharability: 5

Denture Danger: 8

Convenience: 5

Novelty: 7

Overall: 8

It’s Payday! This peanut and caramel candy should be accompanied by every Friday’s payday check; it only seems appropriate. This candy bar doesn’t go beyond how it is described on the wrapper: Peanut Caramel Bar.

Not to say that simplicity is bland. At first bite, the peanuts bring on an immediate salty flavor that fades away into sweetness as you bite into the chewy caramel. The consistency of the soft caramel mixed with that of the crunchy peanuts works really well with the sweet and salty flavor.

Frank Martoccio founded the F.A. Martoccio Macaroni company, was the head of Hollywood Brands, Inc. and manufactured the Zero candy bar. He also introduced the first Payday bar in 1932. Hershey’s now manufactures the Payday.

Just because this isn’t Hershey’s most popular candy doesn’t mean that you should disregard its purchase, if you are nuts for nuts (and caramel) this one will be sure to satisfy.

Sources:

  • http://www.hersheys.com/products/details/payday.asp

Phish and Starburst FaveREDs, like Fish and Chips

Tuesday, November 24th, 2009 by Becca Droz
Starburst Fruit Chews

Starburst Fruit Chews

Sharability: 9

Denture Danger: 8

Convenience: 9

Novelty: 6

Overall: 9

Starbursts, as the name implies, are truly bursting with flavor. During candy’s favorite holiday (Halloween) I was in Indio, California at Phish Festival 8. For those of you that don’t know, this was three days of camping out and three days of listening to the band Phish. During the Halloween night set I made sure to fill my pockets with candy because there’s never a time when candy tastes better than on Halloween AND during a Phish show.

During the set break I was lying down and I heard the people sitting next to me talking about how they were craving some candy. I had just eaten a small bag of skittles so I decided to offer them my fun size pack of Starbursts, which included a pink wrapped strawberry flavor and a red wrapped cherry.

Not only were they thankful for the offer, but I have never seen anyone enjoy a Starburst as much as these two did. They raved about how great the flavor was “Oh wow, this is better than they usually are!” the guy said. “Yeah, I just want to try and keep the flavor going for as long as I possibly can,” said his girlfriend.

They then expressed their disappointments when they had swallowed the remaining pieces of their Starburst. It made me feel great that I was able to bring such simple happiness to these people, but I can’t take the credit. The credit goes to the great taste of the candy. The chewy, sweet, juicy, and flavor filled Starbursts are a candy to be reckoned with.

Starbursts were first produced in the UK in 1960 as Opal Fruits with the flavors strawberry, orange, lemon, and lime. In 1976 production moved into the United States and were renamed to Starburst, in 1998, the Starburst name became global. The Mars company has recently merged with the Wrigley Company and this merged company is who produces the Starburst.

The Starburst FaveREDs include watermelon, cherry, fruit punch, and strawberry flavors. This is a great compilation of some of the best Starburst flavors. I remember when I was younger my friends and I would put the whole starburst in our mouth, wrapper and all, and try and unwrap the candy with our teeth and tongue. I accomplished the feat a few times but I usually ended up unwrapping the slobbery mess with my hands.

Even if it isn’t Halloween, and even if you aren’t at a Phish show, the Starburst candy is sharable, portable, and delectable, so enjoy!
Sources:

  • http://www.wrigley.com/global/brands/starburst.aspx
  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Starburst_(confectionery)

Skittles, Experience the Rainbow

Friday, November 20th, 2009 by Becca Droz
Skittles - Taste the Rainbow

Skittles - Taste the Rainbow

Sharabilty: 8

Denture Danger: 5

Convenience: 6

Novelty: 7

Overall: 9

Skittles, taste the rainbow. The rainbow of chewy, fruity, sweet shelled candy pellets stamped with the letter ‘s.’ Skittles originated in Europe by an English company in 1974 and were fist imported into the United States in 1979. The original flavors are grape, lemon, lime, orange, and strawberry. Skittles is also a lawn game played in Europe, a game similar to bowling.

In the summer months I know we’ve all eagerly accepted a small handful of Skittles from our friend with the bag and had them start to melt in our sweaty hand only to be left with a mouthful of juicy Skittles and a rainbow colored palm.

“Skittles, taste the rainbow” rings in my ears every time I think of Skittles (so I guess they did a good job at coming up with a catchy slogan). As a kid, I remember watching the Skittles commercial where a guy plants a handful of Skittles, which soon results in Skittles pouring down from the rainbow in the sky above. I’m sure everyone has had their fantasy that this has actually happened; in fact I bet some of you have planted a few Skittles in your backyard just hoping that maybe the commercial wasn’t so farfetched.

I know that I have buried those Skittles only to be disappointed in the lack of Skittles falling from the sky. We can’t obtain Skittles by going outside with a bucket, but luckily we have bulk candy websites (like candyfavorites) where we can buy tons of this fruity candy and maybe even simulate our own rainfall of Skittles.

Fun facts: 
Outside the United States, purple is blackcurrant.
In South Korea, Australia, and Taiwan, green apple replaces lime as the green Skittle.

Taste the Fresh and See the Glow With Wint-O-Green Lifesavers

Wednesday, November 18th, 2009 by Becca Droz
Life Savers Wint-0-Green

Life Savers Wint-0-Green

Sharability: 10

Denture Danger: 9 (if you aren’t just using it as a breath mint)

Convenience: 10

Novelty: 6

Overall: 9

Wint-O-Green Lifesavers are more than just a sweet wintergreen taste-bud-tingler, and they are more than just a breath mint, this candy is a science lesson.

If you take these lifesavers into a pitch-black room (a bathroom usually works the best) you can watch science in action. I find it works best with a friend because then you can share the feeling of amazement, but it also works if you are by yourself and look in the mirror.

In the darkened room chew the lifesaver with your mouth open and if you get the right crunch your friend will see sparks of blue light making your mouth glow.

The reason you see these sparks is because of an effect called triboluminescence. Triboluminescence is emission of light as a result of something being crushed or torn, in this case, crystalline sugars. When the candy is crushed electrons are released and these electrons collide with nitrogen molecules in the air, which causes a vibration that results in an ultraviolet spark.

The ultraviolet light that is produced is mostly non-visible, but a small amount is visible which is why sometimes other sugar candies create faint sparks when you bite into them.

The Wint-O-Green lifesaver creates a bright flash because the flavoring, methyl salicylate (a.k.a. wintergreen oil), is florescent. We don’t have to go into wavelengths and all that, but basically the wintergreen oil absorbs the ultraviolet (invisible) light and takes it over, emitting sparks of visible blue light. Crazy, isn’t it? So, before you plop one of these minty sweet lifesavers into your mouth just for the mere taste, share one with a friend, turn off the lights, and show them the magic of science.