Archive for the ‘Candy History’ Category

Dark Chocolate Clark Bars – A history of a classic candy bar revisted!

Friday, July 9th, 2010 by Jon
A vintage Clark Bar Advertisement made long before there was a Dark Chocolate version

Clark Bars have a unique place in Pittsburgh history and were invented in McKeesport where our candy warehouse has been located since 1927! The new Dark Chocolate Clark Bar is a truly delicious twist on an old classic!

The former pride of Pittsburgh and McKeesport , the beloved Clark Bar, has just released a  All Natural Dark Chocolate version which is truly a unique twist on one of the best tasting candy bars available

In case you are not familiar with Clark Bars, they are a candy bar consisting of a honeycomb peanut butter crisp center with a rich milk chocolate covering.

The signature item of one of the country’s largest candy empires started in 1891 with a small operation run by young entrepreneur David L. Clark located in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Within a few years, he made enough money to open a modest factory in McKeesport which is where CandyFavorites has been located since we opened our candy filled warehouse in 1927 ( actually it was in 1926 but we didn’t incorporate until a year later)

 By 1911, the candy had become so popular that the company was forced to relocate, and Mr. Clark purchased a large building from a cracker manufacturer. 

 In the 1920′s, when the company was making approximately one hundred and fifty (150) different types of candy and gum, Mr. Clark decided to create a separate company for the gum-making business, thinking that the candy and gum operations would be more successful if run separately.

 He opened the Clark Brothers Chewing Gum Co. across the street from his candy factory and his family continued to run the business until 1955.  The company remained a Pittsburgh mainstay for several decades but ran into financial difficulties in the 90s and the brand was rescued by the New England Confectionary Company known to candy lovers as NECCO.

In 2010, the formula was changed for Clark Bars and now includes All Natural Ingredients.  The Dark Chocolate version of the Clark Bar is one of the few examples of a formula being improved and we think that this variation is so delicious that, someday, it too will become a classic!

An interview with Gary Duschl about the Worlds Longest Wrigleys Chewing Gum Wrapper Chain

Thursday, April 22nd, 2010 by Jon

Gary Duschl and the Worlds Longest Chewing Gum Wrapper

The other day, I had the good fortune to communicate with Gary Duschl who holds the Guinness Book of World Records for the LONGEST chain made out of gum wrappers.   I asked Gary if he would share his experience with the readers of our  candy blog and below is an excerpt from his reply.

I find project amazing on many levels, both physically and metaphorically, and it is one of the more interesting uses for recycling candy/gum wrappers   – Jon H.Prince, President, CandyFavorites.com

I started the gum wrapper chain on March 11, 1965 while a student in the ninth grade.  As some of the kids were making them and I asked them to show me how to do it.  My competitive nature took over and I had to have the longest chain in the class, then the school, then the town and I just kept going from there.

My wife and I visited the Ripley Museum in Niagara Falls in 1992 and saw what was on display as a giant gum wrapper chain.  My chain dwarfed that one, and after contacting the manager, I found that there was an actual Guinness Record for gum wrapper chains.

I contacted Guinness and they advised as to what I would have to do to register my chain with them.  After doing so, I have held the Guinness World Record for the longest gum wrapper chain ever since.

The chain is made up of Wrigley wrappers only but, unfortunately, Wrigley’s has stopped putting wrappers on their gum in North America which makes finding suitable wrappers more challenging.

I have been in and on numerous radio programs, books, newspaper articles and TV shows including the Rosie O’Donnell show.  I have recently returned from a press conference and book signing at the Ripley Museum in Times Square.  The president of Ripley Entertainment signed the 3 millionth link (1,500,000 wrapper) at a special presentation.

I have been working on the chain now for over 45 years and I do get the odd comment about it being a waste of time although I look at it differently.  I worked as a General Manager with the responsibilities for four plants for the last 40 years and have just recently retired.  I play golf, baseball, hockey and guitar and have a number of other outside interests.

I work on the chain while relaxing in front of the TV and add to it a little every day.  I do this as well as other things, not instead of other things and it is surprising how things grow if you add to them a little at a time on a regular basis.

I have averaged 91 wrappers a day for the last 45 years and the result is a chain 63,527 feet long. It is measured by professional land surveyors every March 11th and I send this new information to Guinness every year so they can update their data base.

I am very proud of my status with Guinness and with Ripley’s.  It is a tremendous feeling to be recognized as the best in the world in your field or profession.  Guinness has recently nominated my record as one of the top 100 records of the decade.  After the polling by Guinness of fans all over the world, my record was voted tops in my category (stunts) and as a result is now included in the Guinness top 10 records of the decade.  My ultimate goal is to have my Guinness World Record Gum Wrapper Chain reach a marathon length of 26.2 miles.

My website is www.gumwrapper.com and no, I have not chewed all the gum myself.  I have received wrappers from wonderful people all over the world. I also have a video on YouTube which I use to show people how to make their own chains

Brach’s Butterscotch Raises the Beauty of Simplicity Bar a Notch

Monday, April 19th, 2010 by Jon
Brachs Butterscotch Disks

Brach's Butterscotch Disks are the standard by which all Butterscotch Disks are measured....

Sharability: 10

Denture Danger: 8

Convenience: 10

Novelty: 8

Overall: 9

 These simple little classic disc candies are one of the best.

The butterscotch flavor just hits the spot no matter what mood you might be in. Butterscotch is a color, and a flavor, and yours truly, a candy. Butterscotch’s base ingredients are brown sugar and butter; corn syrup, vanilla, salt, and cream are usually added to the concoction to create the deliciousness that this candy so well exemplifies.

It is made similarly to toffee, but the sugar is boiled to different levels in the two candies.

 The word butterscotch prossibly originated in Doncaster, England by a man named Samuel Parkinson. He began making candy in 1817 and in 1851 the Queen royally approved the recipe.

It is a good thing she did or else we might not have these sweet satisfying little discs to bring us an extra moment of happiness in our beautifully busy, yet amazingly enjoyable, ineffably incredible lives.

 Sources:

http://www.doncasterbutterscotch.com/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Butterscotch

http://www.baking911.com/candy/butterscotch.htm

Rollin’ Rolos

Thursday, January 28th, 2010 by Jon
This is a rare Rolo label from the 1970's and it shows the manufacturer as being Mackintosh which was the manufacturer in England

This is a rare Rolo label from the 1970's and it shows the manufacturer as being Mackintosh which was the manufacturer in England

Sharability: 3

Denture Danger: 8

Convenience: 5

Novelty: 10

Overall: 9

 1937 isn’t just the year that U.S. Steel raised workers’ wages to $5 a day, or just the year that the first quadruplets finished college, or just the year that China declared war on Japan. 1937 is the year that the Rolo candy was introduced.

Nestlé Rowntree manufactured this delicious candy, and Nestlé continues to produce Rolos everywhere except in the United States. Here in America, we have accredited The Hershey Company with the Rolo candy since 1969.

Rich milk chocolate surrounding a soft, chewy caramel filling; this candy is classic, this candy is delicious, and this candy is rolly. The most well known Rolo slogan, “Do you love anyone enough to give them your last Rolo?” is quite appropriate because the Rolos used to come with 11 in every package leaving 10 for you, but in 1995 Rolos reduced the number of candies in each package to 10 making giving up one much more difficult.

They also advertise the candies as rollable, you can roll them to your friend, you can roll them to your mom, or you can roll them to me.

A few fun facts about the vintage Rolo label:

This wrapper is interesting as it shows the “Mackintosh’s” brand above the candy name

Originally, Rolo’s were from the United Kingdom and it wasn’t until the early 1980’s, when Hershey acquired the brand, that the Mackintosh name would be removed from the label.

Also, if you look carefully, you will see that NECCO is on the label and that is because the New England Confectionary Company was the original distributor and manufacturer of Rolo’s in the United States.

 

Sources:
http://www.hersheys.com/products/details/rolo.asp
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rolo
 http://www.brainyhistory.com/years/1937.html
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/nestle-keeps-mum-as-last-rolo-goes-missing-1526432.html

The Mallo Cup Sets the Bar For Cup Candies

Friday, January 22nd, 2010 by Jon
A retro Mallo Cup wrapper from the 1970's

A retro Mallo Cup wrapper from the 1970's

Sharability: 4

Denture Danger: 7

Convenience: 4

Novelty: 10

Overall: 8

The Reese’s Cup might taste better (and it might not, it’s all a matter of opinion), but it doesn’t have the novelty factor of being the first ever cup candy made in the United States. The Mallo Cup takes the trophy for this honor.

The whipped cream center has the consistency of melty marshmallow and is covered in a chocolate coconuty cup shell. The taste is odd at first but quickly grows on you and if you don’t like it, I’m sure someone at the lunch table will be happy to relieve you of the burden of eating the second cup.

Boyer Brothers, Inc. founded in 1936 in Altoona, PA is the company that manufactures these gloop filled cups. They used to manufacture many different kinds of cup candies including a s’mores cup and a peanut butter marshmallow cup, but all of these came after the original Mallo. Now, the only cups they manufacture are the peanut butter cup (the standing competitor of the Reese’s cup), the smoothie cup which is a peanut butter butterscotch cup, and of course, the Mallo.

Fun facts:
-The Boyer Plant makes over 2 million cups every day. If you were to line these cups up side by side they would cover 58 miles.
- It takes 20 tons of the Mallo filling to fill 2,000,000 Mallo Cups.

Sources:

http://www.boyercandies.com/

Baby Food or Chocolate Coated, Malted Milk Balls Are Delicious

Monday, December 7th, 2009 by Jon
Chocolate Malted Milk Balls are one of our favorite candies and we offer Brachs Malts as well as Whoppers to name but a few brands that we represent

Chocolate Malted Milk Balls are one of our favorite candies and we offer Brachs Malts as well as Whoppers to name but a few brands that we represent

Sharability: 8

Denture Danger: 4

Convenience: 3

Novelty: 6

Overall: 8

Obviously, (almost) anything covered in chocolate is a taste treat. Even though the malted milk ends up stuck in your teeth it is worth the crunch that it adds to the soft melty milk chocolate. These little generic malt balls are tasty, but they don’t come close to the satisfaction you find when you bite into a real gourmet malt ball also known as Brachs Malts.  But not to say these malt balls aren’t delicious, they way they melt in you mouth or crunch between your teeth is quite unique. 

Malted milk is a powdered food that is made of malted barley, wheat flour, and evaporated whole milk, all mixed together in one crunchy, airy snack.
The idea for malted milk was originated by a pharmacist named James Horlick who was trying to develop a wheat and malt based nutritional supplement for infants.

In 1873, James and his brother William formed their own baby food company. Soon after, they patented their formula for of dried milk, trademarking the name “malted milk” and marketing their product as “Diastoid.”

Though the intentions were to make a healthy supplement for infants, malted milk became popular in may other respects. The fact that it was lightweight, non-perishable, and packed a lot of calories made it a perfect snack for exploring travelers worldwide. 

 It was also a popular drink that was commonly found at soda fountains and a delectable addition to ice cream. Now you can find malted milk within the shell of chocolate in almost any candy store.

Go Bananas for Circus Marshmallow Peanuts

Wednesday, November 4th, 2009 by Jon
Marshmallow Peanuts are one of the oldest candies and few people know that the flavor is banana!

Marshmallow Peanuts are one of the oldest candies and few people know that the flavor is banana!

Sharability: 10

Denture Danger: 2

Convenience: 6

Novelty: 9

Overall: 5

Also known as a circus peanut, this orange peanut shaped marshmallow became one of the first penny candies after it was introduced in the mid 1800s.

To be honest, I never understood why everyone liked these things so much. Yes they have a good texture, and yes they are a classic, but what I don’t understand is why the peanut shaped marshmallow taste like artificial banana. It just doesn’t make sense.

 If you are a fan of marshmallows that taste like bananas, then this candy might be your calling. Unless you are trying to relive memories from the past, this almost sickeningly sweet confectionary won’t leave you very satisfied.

In 1963 man named John Holahan discovered that the shavings of the circus peanut are a delicious addition to breakfast cereal. Mr. Holahan was coincidentally the vice president of General Mills and these marshmallow shavings were the influence to creating the first cereal with marshmallow bits (marbits) and one of everyone’s favorite cereals, Lucky Charms.

For some reason the Lucky Charms marshmallows were created without that banana flavoring. If only the Lucky Charms’ marshmallows were enlarged to the size of the circus peanut… now that would be profitable product.

(You can get them individually wrapped too!)

Share Your Lemonheads Amongst Friendlyheads

Monday, August 24th, 2009 by Jon
Did you know that over 500 Million - no, this is not a typo - Lemonheads are produced yearly!

Did you know that over 500 Million - no, this is not a typo - Lemonheads are produced yearly!

Sharability: 10

Denture Danger: 7

Convenience: 7

Novelty: 8

Overall: 9

 Not to be confused with the 90’s rock band, lemonheads are a small ball of a hard candy coated in a soft sugary layer that adds the bang to the tang.

The big lemon heads are good, I mean who doesn’t like one of their favorite candies in monster size, but they don’t have the same tang as the small original lemon heads that you get in the concessions box at the movies. It has to do with the ratio of hard candy center to the soft sour outer shell.

The original lemonheads have a perfect ratio that blends well whether you chew it up your let it melt away in your mouth. The big lemon head has a thick sour coating that is delicious, but is gone well before the large ball of candy.

 Lemonheads originated in 1962 from the Ferrara Pan Company using the same method used to make Red Hots. The hard candy center is made by mixing and heating sugar and corn syrup, pulling and kneading the dough-like clump of sugar to aerate it, and forming it into a rope that is pressed between two rollers that form the candy balls.

After cooling, the balls are put into the same revolving pan that Ferrara’s atomic fireballs were put into, a process known as the cold panned process. As the candy beads spin around and around corn syrup and sugar are added which gives them a sugary coating that continues to build in layers to form the shell as the pan continues to spin and more ingredients are added.

 Through my personal experience I have seen Lemonheads hoarded by kids and I have seen them being shared amongst friends. One little Lemonhead holds the same sweet and sour satisfaction as ten so don’t hesitate to dish out Lemonheads to your envious friends. Approximately 500 million lemonheads are created by the Ferrara Pan Company each year, get out there and eat your share.

SWEDISH FISH: The Journey From Sweden to the USA

Monday, July 20th, 2009 by Jon
Swedish Fish are one of the most enduring and popular gummi candies

Swedish Fish are an enduring retro candy favorite!

Sharability: 10

Denture Danger: 7

Convenience: 7

Novelty: 7

Overall: 7

The Swedish Fish, as the name implies originated in Sweden by the Malaco candy company.

In 1958 the Malaco company began exporting some of their candy goods to North America starting with licorices. In the late 60s into the early 70s Malaco started exporting Swedish fish and Swedish berries (the same candy shaped as berries and, sadly, now discontinued) which were altered slightly to appeal to the North American market.

The Swedish fish are now made by the Cadbury Adams Company in Canada and are distributed all over the US. The winegum Swedish fish candies are a popular concession candy and are loved by people of all ages world-wide, especially in Sweden.

Winegum candies are very popular in Sweden are made in many different shapes including flowers, cars, coins, and boats. In Sweden the candy is called “Pastellfiskar” which literally means “pale colored fishes.” The original red fish is of an almost indistinguishable flavor that in my opinion seems to be a mix between cherry and strawberry.

Swedish fish come in different sizes (as there are all different sized fish in the sea) and in different flavors (as does most candy). You can find yellow lemon, green lime, orange orange, and purple grape Swedish fish flavors if the original read doesn’t tingle your taste buds. Forget paying for overpriced Swedish fish at the movie theatre, prepare ahead of time and order your Pastellfiskars from candyfavorites.com.

Double your Bubbles with Dubble Bubble Bubble Gum

Thursday, July 16th, 2009 by Jon
Dubble Bubble Gum was invented in 1928

Dubble Bubble Gum was invented in 1928

Sharability: 10

Denture Danger: 10 (what can I say? It is gum)

Convenience: 9

Novelty: 8

Overall: 7

 Dubble Bubble was first invented in 1928 by a man named Walter E. Diemer, an accountant at Fleer chewing gum company. Diemer experimented with chewing gum recipes and one day accidentally created a less sticky, more stretchable gum, and best of all, it made bubbles!

Beginning in 1930 the gum was wrapped up with a comic strip about twin brothers Dub and Bub. Dubble Bubble was even a part of military rations during World War II. It wasn’t long before the gum was wrapped without the accompaniment of a comic strip and put on the shelf next to a variety of Dubble Bubble flavors including grape, watermelon, and apple. The newer flavors all pale in comparison to the original bubble gum flavor.

 The colorful yellow, blue, red, white, and pink Dubble Bubble wrapper is an automatic attraction to the eyes. You pull the ends and out spins a bright pink cylinder chunk that you get to toss into your mouth. The first few chews are a little tough on the jaw, but the juicy bubble gum flavor leaks out as the chunk of gum becomes softer and easier to chew.

Then you get to stretch out the gum around your tongue and blow your best bubble. The gum is slightly thicker than other gums which makes the bubble’s walls more durable and stretchable for bubble blowing. It may loose its flavor but it never looses the chewy bubbleable consistency.

 My friend Mark had been chewing a piece of Dubble Bubble for a little while before he randomly blurted out: “I really like this gum!” When I pressed him for why he said, “It’s really chewy and has a lot of flavor and it is not the standard bubble gum taste.” I couldn’t have said it better myself! So if you aren’t feeling up for a piece of candy, grab a piece of Dubble Bubble Bubble Gum instead and blow away.