Author Archive

Bit-O-Honey – A Nostalgic Taffy History

Friday, January 31st, 2014 by Laurnie Wilson

retro-bit-o-honey-candy-wrapperBit-O-History

There’s something great about the sweet stick-to-your teeth Bit-O-Honey that everybody knows and loves. It’s a nostalgic treat that’s been around for what feels like an eternity. But did you know all the chewy details of its past?

Bit-O-Honey first took the stage in 1924. In that year, Schutter-Johnson Company, based in Chicago, Illinois, created a new kind of candy bar. A bar made of almond bits in a honey-flavored taffy; Bit-O-Honey was a far cry from popular chocolate bars at the time.

Made with egg white for extra chew, the six pieces of taffy wrapped in wax paper were a huge success. People were craving that taffy from the minute it was on the market!

bit-o-honey-unwrapped-taffyBit-O-Change

Then in 1969, Schutter-Johnson Company merged with NYC’s Ward Company, the makers of Chunky, Oh Henry! and Raisinets. It was during the time of this merger that a chocolate version of the treat, aptly named, Bit-O-Chocolate was made. However, something about the chocolate variety didn’t catch on, and the product was later discontinued.

Other flavors like Bit-O-Licorice and Bit-O-Peanut Butter were also made, but, once again, failed to find wide approval. Clearly, when it comes to Bit-O-Honey, if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it!

Bit-O-Bee

Although the different flavors didn’t work out so well, there was an addition from the late 70’s that did manage to stick around. Can you guess what it is? The Bit-O-Honey bumblebee, of course!

This guy has been adorning Bit-O-Honey wrappers for over 30 years! And, just like the original flavor, he doesn’t seem to be going anywhere.

bit-o-honey-modern-wrapperBit-O-Quality

Nestle bought the Bit-O-Honey brand in 1984, and just last year, Pearson’s Candy Company purchased Bit-O-Honey from Nestle. But while this classic treat has been shuffled around quite a bit in its day, you can bet that the Bit-O-Honey you bite into now is just as good as the original.

Text Sources:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bit-O-Honey
http://www.candyblog.net/blog/item/bit_o_honey
http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/05/01/ct-pearson-bitohoney-idUSnPNNY04841+1e0+PRN20130501
http://pearsonscandy.com/candy/bit-o-honey

Image Sources:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bit-O-Honey
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Bit-O-Honey-Bar.jpg
http://tgm123.com/bit-o-honey-singles-10x36x1-7oz/

Candy History: Angel Mints

Monday, December 23rd, 2013 by Laurnie Wilson

A Mint From The Past

am_singleIf you’ve eaten candy in the last almost 100 years, then chances are you’ve had Angel Mints. These minty masterpieces were first introduced in 1919 on the Atlantic City boardwalk. The boardwalk was the birthplace of many popular time-tested candies, such as Salt Water Taffy, as people are more apt to treat themselves to sugar on a day in the sun.

Originally, each batch of Angel Mints was cooked in copper kettles over gas stoves, to maximize moisture content. After cooking, the candies were individually wrapped to ensure freshness. It’s that little extra effort that has continued to make a huge difference in taste for almost a century.

Divinely Inspired?

And the heavenly name? Legend goes that people raved about the candy’s peppermint zing with comments like, “this candy tastes heavenly” and “this recipe had to be divinely inspired,” so that the candy maker could see no more fitting name than Angel Mints! Not bad, eh?

Peppermint Power

angel-mints-bigOne of the reasons Angel Mints have remained so popular over the years is their apparent healing property. The peppermint oil in each Angel Mint has palliative therapy benefits that have been reported to help treat indigestion, respiratory problems, and everything in between.

In fact, peppermint oil has a whole host of healthy properties. It contains manganese, iron, magnesium, calcium, folate, potassium, copper, omega-3 fatty acids, and vitamins A and C. As if you needed more reasons to love Angel Mints! Now you know, they’re actually good for your health!

A 21st Century Mint

Today, production of Angel Mints has moved to Florida, but the process hasn’t changed a bit. Each batch is still handmade according to the original recipe, and wrapped on the same K-H cut and wrap machines that have been around since the dawn of Angel Mints time. A traditional process in a modern era: now that’s history that you can taste.

Source Material

http://www.angelmint.com/our-candy/angel-mints/

Images

http://www.angelmint.com/our-candy/angel-mints/
http://store.veganessentials.com/angel-mints-by-florida-candy-company-p4034.aspx

Candy History: Candy Canes

Friday, December 20th, 2013 by Laurnie Wilson

The Origins of the Candy Cane

We’ve probably all heard the story of the German choirmaster who created white, sugary shepherd’s hooks to keep the children quiet during the services. But, there are almost as many candy cane creation stories as there are varieties of candy canes!

What’s certain is that these popular Christmas treats were originally all white. Many have attached a religious connection to them, saying that the white candy cane represented the sinlessness of the life of Jesus. As for the shape, many also claim that it’s meant to look like a shepherd’s hook, to remind children of the shepherds who visited the baby Jesus.

candy_canes_white-candy-cane
Although they were probably created in 1670 in Germany, it wasn’t until 1844 that a recipe for straight candy sticks was published. And in the mid 1800s, candy canes were hung on Christmas trees for the first time. Back in the day, it was common to hang sweets and baked goods from the festive tree, so the candy canes were a perfect addition!

Candy Stripes

retro-nostalgic-candy-canesChristmas cards from before and after the 1900s reveal that it wasn’t until the turn of the century that candy canes earned their stripes. There’s lots of lore around the stripes as well, with some saying the thickest stripe represents Jesus, while the three smaller stripes represent the Holy Trinity.

Around the turn of the century, peppermint and wintergreen flavors were also added to the sweets, whose flavors could be distinguished by either a red or green stripe, for peppermint or wintergreen, respectively.

In the 1950s, a Catholic priest by the name of Gregory Keller invented an automated candy cane machine, to twist the candies into their popular shape. And since then, there’s been no looking back.

Today, candy canes are arguably the most popular holiday candy with the longest-standing history. And they’re not just peppermint and wintergreen anymore. Check out all of the canes we have to offer. You’re sure to find something for every candy-cane-craving sweet tooth.

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Source Material

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Candy_cane
http://inventors.about.com/od/foodrelatedinventions/a/candy_canes.htm

Images

http://whydyoueatthat.wordpress.com/2011/12/06/day-6-candy-canes/
http://justalittlefurther.com/making-candy-canes/

Candy History: Necco Peach Blossoms

Saturday, December 7th, 2013 by Laurnie Wilson

A Peach Blossom A Day

Peach Blossoms are a candy that tastes as sweet as it sounds. A truly American treat, they also happen to be made by an American company with a history that stretches far longer than you may have expected.

It all started back in 1847. It was in this fateful year that a man by the name of Oliver Chase invented the lozenge cutter. Chase was a pharmacist, so he wasn’t necessarily in the candy-making business. But, as it turns out, the creation of this machine, which allowed long ropes of sugar to be cut into manageable pieces, was just what the confectionary doctor had ordered.

retro-necco-peach-blossomsIn fact, the machine was first used to slice up what we know today as NECCO Wafers. Originally used as cough drops, or a way to soothe the stomach, these wafers were yet to come into their candy prime. Alas, who would have known that a simple little machine, similar to a pasta maker, would have such an impact on U.S. candy production?

Peach Blossoms Blossom

In 1901, Chase & Company, Hayward & Company, and Wright & Moody – three pre-Civil-War-era candy companies – joined forces to become NECCO: the New England Confectionary Company that we know and love today.

Four years later, in 1905, NECCO introduced Peach Blossoms. And the smooth peanut butter, wrapped in a crunchy candy coating has been delighting sweet tooths ever since.

But, don’t expect Peach Blossoms to actually taste like peaches. The candy is more reminiscent of the flower than the fruit, as there’s no peach flavoring inside. Somehow, the misleading name has never been a turnoff, as generations have been enjoying the candy ever since.

buy-necco-peach-blossoms-onlinePeachy Keen

Today, Peach Blossoms are manufactured in Revere, Massachusetts. The factory still uses many machines that have been around since before World War II and relies on real live workers to add food coloring and whisk mixtures – no fully automated candy production, here! So the Peach Blossoms you buy today are made with the same personal touch that has been sweetening every batch for decades.

Source Material:

Image Sources:

Candy History: Old Fashion Christmas Hard Candy

Thursday, November 21st, 2013 by Laurnie Wilson

old-fashioned-christmas-hard-candySpecial Occasion Candy

Few things are sweeter at Christmas time than a handful of candy. Everyone has a favorite holiday treat that they look forward to all year round. There’s just something especially nice about savoring a candy that only comes by for special occasions. And while we can’t imagine ringing in the Yule-tide feelings without a sugary treat or two, it wasn’t always this way.

Old Fashioned Sweetness

While people have been enjoying sweets for centuries, the first mention of Christmas candy came in the form of candy canes. In 1672, the choirmaster of the Cologne Cathedral created white, sugary sticks to keep the children quiet in his church. These boring white staffs morphed over the years into the hooked, red and white striped favorites we know today – and they still have the remarkable ability to hush any whiny mouth.

old-fashioned-christmas-ribbon-candyOver the years, the tradition of cut rock candy has remained a staple of Christmas festivities.  Decades of grandmothers have known the secrets behind whipping up the perfect batch of sugary confections: ribbons, bows, and disks, all dyed and pulled to perfection. It’s a tough job, but somebody had to do it!

Luckily, with our Old Fashioned Christmas Candy Mix, you never have to worry if your sugar has reached the proper boiling point. You can have all your favorite Christmas candies, with none of the sugar-burning disasters.

Old Fashioned, Not Outdated

candy-cane-figurinesThat said, not all homemade candy attempts end in failure. In fact, some of the most beloved candies started in home kitchens before rising to the greatness they have today.

And speaking of great candies, if you enjoy nostalgic confections, you should take a look at our Americana Penny Candy Mix. Chock-full of sweets you may remember as a kid, this is one mix that shouldn’t be missed.

Around the holidays, we celebrate the things we hold most dear: family, friends, and the candies we grew up loving as children. With our Old Fashioned Christmas Mix, you can help make Christmas traditions come true.

Sources:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Candy_cane

http://www.happywink.org/christmas-day/christmas-candy.html

Candy History: Christmas Candy in America

Thursday, November 14th, 2013 by Laurnie Wilson

Announcing a new Christmas Candy favorite!

Christmas-penny-candy-Americana-mixMost of our top-10 bestselling candies year after year are Brach’s candies like Butterscotch Disks, Villa Cherries, and Ice Blue Mint Coolers. But every year, there’s one candy mix — only sold at CandyFavorites.com – that manages to rank among those established favorites. Penny Candy Americana Mix delivers joy to everyone who encounters it by bringing back the tastes of childhood for all ages.

What better time for the wonderful magic of rediscovery than Christmas morning?

This year, we’re excited to introduce Christmas Candy Americana Mix!

A Mixed History

The history of Christmas candy in America is one that can bring back fond memories for almost anyone, as everyone seems to have their own personal Christmas candy history and experiences. Our love of Christmas candy in America stretches back many generations, linking families and taste buds for over a century.

Did you know that the first mention of candy canes in America was in 1847? A German immigrant by the name of August Imgard decorated his Christmas tree with them in that year, and they’ve been a perennial Christmas favorite in the U.S., ever since.

Traditionally Minded

In fact, Americans are pretty traditional when it comes to their candy favorites. Our Americana Penny Candy Mix pays tribute to some of the oldest and most revered candies in America.

Would you believe that most of the top-selling candies in America today were first introduced before World War II? It’s true, and for good reason. If you have a good thing, why bother changing it? And, in the early part of the 20th century, America was brimming with delicious, new chocolates and candies.

Twizzlers and Hershey Bars have been in production since 1845 and 1900, respectively.  These top candies are an ongoing testament that our appreciation of quintessentially Americana candy runs deep.

christmas-candy-spearmint-leavesAmericana for All

When it comes to Christmas candy, we Americans are devoted to our time-tested favorites. Everyone seems to love biting into a candy that reminds them of the magic of Christmases in their childhood. There’s something really sweet about revisiting those memories of a time when Spearmint Leaves cost a penny and Hershey bars went for only a nickel.

Our brand new Christmas Candy Americana Mix evokes all of the nostalgic thoughts of yesteryear, with a little bit of everything inside. So when you bite into one of these candies, you know you’re tasting some of the best that American Christmas candy has to offer.

Sources:

http://inventors.about.com/od/foodrelatedinventions/a/candy_canes.htm

http://www.candycanefacts.com/facts/

http://images.businessweek.com/ss/09/10/1021_americas_25_top_selling_candies/26.htm

http://www.candyblog.net/blog/item/spearmint_leaves

Candy History: Abba Zaba

Friday, November 8th, 2013 by Laurnie Wilson

The Early Days of a Retro Candy Bar

abba-zabba-unwrapped-candy-bar The history of the Abba-Zaba bar goes way back, all the way to 1922, to be exact. It was a different time, then. The first radio had just arrived at the White House, Egypt received independence from Great Britain, and a little candy company called Colby and McDermott was manufacturing a new kind of candy bar in Los Angeles, California.

What made this candy so special, you might ask? Well, it consisted of a white taffy exterior with a creamy peanut butter center. Known as the Abba-Zaba bar, this stick-to-your-teeth confection became a huge hit out west, where they still carry the biggest clout, today.

In The Spotlight

Anyone who loves the Abba-Zaba bar will recognize that black and yellow Taxi-cab-esque exterior. But are you familiar with the original wrapper scandal? Early Abba-Zaba wrappers from Colby & McDermott depict what appear to be African tribesmen in a jungle, sitting beside a taffy tree. And while this racially taboo packaging would never fly today, it didn’t do the brand any damage when the candy first came out.

The Abba-Zaba bar has also made numerous TV and movie appearances in its sweet history, racking up quite a few screen creds- the most famous of which may be from its mention in the movie Half Baked.

abba-zaba-cartoon

So Famous!

Abba-Zaba Today

abba-zabba-candy-bar-taffyOver the years, manufacturing of the candy passed first to Cardinet Candy and then to Annabelle Candy Company in 1978. But despite frequent company changes, the original Abba-Zaba taste has remained the same.

Today, Annabelle Candy Company manufactures the Abba-Zaba bar in Hayward, California. The candy is Kosher pareve and is even available in new flavors. You can now get your Abba-Zaba fix with green-apple flavored taffy, or a chocolate, instead of peanut butter, filling.

And once you’ve gotten your hands on one, the choice is yours on how you want to enjoy it. Some say freezing them is the best way. Others say leaving them in a hot car does the trick. Either way, you’re in for a treat.

Sources

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abba-Zaba
http://www.candywrappermuseum.com/abbazaba.html
http://www.seriouseats.com/2010/08/abba-zaba-candy-taffy-peanut-butter-you-my-only-friend.html
https://www.facebook.com/ABBAZABA

 

Candy History: Cracker Jacks

Thursday, October 31st, 2013 by Laurnie Wilson

A Man and His Popcorn

popcorn-cracker-jacks2Nothing screams Americana quite like the 7th inning stretch and a box of Cracker Jacks. But would you believe this time-tested snack was created by a German immigrant and debuted not at the ballpark, but at the World’s Fair? The story of this American candy classic is an interesting one, indeed.

Frederick William Rueckheim had been selling popcorn on the streets of Chicago for years, when, in 1893, he came up with a new popcorn creation for the Chicago World’s Fair. When his brother Louis arrived from Germany, they established the F.W. Rueckheim & Bro. company to sell their popcorn together.

What is a Cracker Jack?

In 1896 the name Cracker Jack was officially registered (before then the snack had been called candied popcorn and peanuts) and the familiarly sticky and sweet candy we know today was born.

Back in the day, the term “cracker jack” could refer to anything of high quality, so it’s no wonder the name stuck! The coining of the name, however, was just the first of many big steps for this candy favorite.

Out of Left Field

Henry Gottlieb Eckstein’s invention of the “Eckstein Triple Proof Bag” in 1899 made him the perfect business partner for the Rueckheim brothers. And, in 1902, the company became Rueckheim Bros & Eckstein.

cracker-jack-retroBut it would take six more years before Cracker Jacks came into their own. In 1908, Jack Norworth penned the infamous lines of “Take Me Out To The Ballgame” that shot Cracker Jacks into the limelight. Since then, no baseball game has been complete without at least one box of the crunchy, sweet treat.

Changes came to the company, fast and furious, as Cracker Jacks grew in popularity. In 1912 Rueckheim Bros & Eckstein began adding tiny prizes to each box of Cracker Jacks. Candy and toys? These guys really knew what would sell. The face of Cracker Jacks got another boost in 1918, when Sailor Jack and his dog Bingo were added to the packaging.

The endearing duo was apparently based on Rueckheim’s grandson and dog. But, I’d say it’s probably not a coincidence that they appeared at the end of the 1st World War. A patriotic move, if I do say so myself.

A Home Run

cracker-jacks-originalFour years later, the company underwent another name change, this time becoming The Cracker Jack Company. This name lasted through much of the 20th century, until Borden bought it in 1964.

Today, Cracker Jacks are made by Frito-Lay. They’re still a fan favorite at baseball games, enchanting the young and the young-at-heart as they have for decades. So while the prizes may have changed over the years, you can be sure that the candy inside hasn’t changed a bit.

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Sources:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cracker_Jack
http://inventors.about.com/library/inventors/blcrackerjacks.htm
http://www.delish.com/food-fun/cracker-jack-history-snack-foods#slide-2

Candy History: Zero Bars

Thursday, October 24th, 2013 by Laurnie Wilson

A Candy By Another Name

The history of the Zero bar is a cool one, indeed. In 1920, the Hollywood Brands Company introduced what was then called the Double Zero Bar. At that time, the Minnesota based company manufactured the candies at a factory in Centralia, Illinois. Made of caramel, peanut, almond, and nougat, and covered with a layer of white fudge, it wasn’t long before these Double Zero Bars were known for their distinctive white exterior.

Back in the day, these sweet treats sold for only a penny each, boasting a label that promised kids a steam engine toy if they sent in ten wrappers and fifteen cents. Now that’s the kind of deal you won’t hear about, anymore. It wasn’t until 1934 when the Double Zero Bar was renamed, simply, Zero.

Winds of Change

For the past 93 years, the Zero bar has undergone transformations both big and small. This resilient little candy survived multiple buyouts, first by Consolidated Foods Corporation in 1967, and then Huhtamaki Oy in 1988. It even managed to rebound from a fire that destroyed the Centralia, Illinois plant in 1980.

zero-bar-todayOver the years, the packaging may have changed- losing the polar bears and frigid arctic scene for a more space-aged, stream-lined design- but the message has always been clear: Zero bars are as cool as zero degrees. They happen to taste great out of the freezer, too.

Today, Zero Bars are produced by Hershey. At almost 100 years old, it’s safe to say that Zero Bars are truly an American classic. So no matter the name change, or the company transfers, one bite of these time-tested treats and you’ll go right back to your youth, regardless of the decade.