Author Archive

Another Candy Case Giveaway!

Tuesday, February 4th, 2014 by Jessica Prokop

Join our delicious email list!

Treasure chest-original

A few months ago, we gave away a briefcase packed with candy.

Now there’s another one up for grabs!

We already know it holds almost 400 pieces of candy, so we’ll be doing this a little differently. This time, we’ll just draw a name from our mailing list. All you have to do for a chance to win is be on the list. If you’re already on the list, you’re already in the running. If not, sign up!

* indicates required


Things we email about:

  • Coupon Codes & Flash Sales
  • Discontinued Candy Alerts
  • Contests (like this one)
  • Exclusive Discounts
  • Rare & Hard-to-Find Candies

It’s only the awesomest of awesome! We’ll draw a winner on Friday, February 28th!

*No purchase necessary to enter or win. Winners will be notified via the email address used to sign up for our mailing list. If no reply is received within 48 hours, another name will be drawn. This will be repeated until the prize has been claimed.

The History of Pez Iconic Candy Dispensers

Thursday, January 23rd, 2014 by Jessica Prokop

early-pez-dispensersNothing says childhood quite like PEZ. There’s something nostalgic about these familiar little treats that bring back memories of yesteryear with each and every bite. But would you believe that your favorite PEZ didn’t start out as the fruity candy we know and love today? It’s true! In fact, this is one candy that has a history that may surprise you.

Pfefferminz to PEZ

Eduard Haas III invented PEZ in 1927, in Vienna, Austria. The name of the candy originated from the German word for peppermint, which happens to be “pfeffermintz.” Haas took the ‘p,’ ‘e,’ and ‘z’ from the German word to get the candy’s name, PEZ. And after eight years, the company was doing so well that they had to build a factory in Czechoslovakia to increase production.

PEZ For Your Health

Then in 1948, Oscar Uxa revolutionized the PEZ experience, designing a PEZ dispenser that allowed one piece of candy to be dispensed at a time. This was a sanitary measure that prevented people from touching every piece of candy before choosing one. However, it also doubled as an anti-smoking campaign.

The push for people to eat PEZ instead of smoking a cigarette was a real one. In fact, early slogans for the candy boasted, “No smoking, PEZing Allowed” as Haas hoped his candy might lower smoking rates.

PEZ in the USA

pez-space-gun-dispensersIt wasn’t until 1952 that PEZ made their way to the United States. In that year, the first U.S. PEZ headquarters were established in New York City. Despite PEZ’s success in Europe, Curtis Allina, the first president of PEZ in the U.S., found the candy difficult to sell because of the strong peppermint flavor. So, in an attempt to draw children to the brand, PEZ came up with the idea to create fruity flavored versions and cute, character-themed dispensers.

The idea worked. In no time, children and adults alike were in love with PEZ. The very first dispensers available were a Full-body Santa, Robot, and Space Gun. And since then, the character-themed dispensers have really taken off! Today, there are countless different PEZ dispensers to choose from, and ten different candy flavors available. We have Hello Kitty PEZ Dispensers, Marvel Superhero PEZ dispensers, and everything in between. There really is a PEZ for everybody.

pez-dispensersFrom Far to Near

And while PEZ are sold worldwide, the PEZ candy that you eat in the USA is made in America. So with a single satisfying click of any PEZ dispenser, you can feel good knowing that the candy in your mouth is really much closer to home than you would expect.

Remember Licorice Snaps?

Thursday, January 16th, 2014 by Jessica Prokop

Snap From The Past

retro-candy-covered-licorice-snapsBlack licorice. Some people love it. Some people hate it. But no matter where you stand on the licorice spectrum, wouldn’t licorice be better if it was coated in something sweet?  Like candy? We think so, and apparently we’re not alone. You see, the good people at the American Licorice Company are one step ahead of you, and have been for quite a few decades.

An Instant Classic

The American Licorice Company started in 1914 in Chicago, Illinois. Back then, their very first candy was licorice twists. Next came licorice cigarettes and cigars, during the Great Depression. As it turns out, when times were tough, people seemed to need a candy fix even more than when the living was easy. It wasn’t until the 1930s that The Original Snaps Classic Chewy Candy appeared on the main stage.

Snaps, with their licorice center and pastel candy coating, became an instant classic. Originally, they were sold in distinctive red boxes for only 2 cents each. That’s a bargain you won’t see anymore! Even the packaging boasted of the Snaps success, deeming them the “Classic Chewy Candy.” There’s no doubt that these were a fantastic hit.

Original Licorice Snaps PictureLong Live the Snappy Memories

Over the years, Snaps have had a somewhat turbulent history culminating in their recently being discontinued. But they’ve had a long run, developing a cult-like following in the process.

Until very recently, Snaps enjoyed a beloved treat by baby boomers and many more. For those who enjoy the bite of black licorice mixed with a sweet sheen of candy, this has been the treat of choice since its debut in the 30s. It will go down as one of the most iconic late candies of our era. But when you need a candy-coated-licorice fix, former Snaps lovers will have to resort to Licorice Pastilles and Good ‘N Plenty like everyone else.

Sources: Text and Images

http://www.americanlicorice.com/about/companyhistory/
http://www.candyfavorites.com/blog/licorice-snaps-the-new-formula/
http://www.candyfavorites.com/blog/claps-for-licorice-snaps/

Candy History: Brach’s Chocolate Stars

Thursday, December 12th, 2013 by Jessica Prokop

Ask anyone on the street if they’ve ever heard of Brach’s candy and they’ll probably think of those infamous bulk bins in the grocery store. Or, they may sing you a little jingle, “Stop where you are, buy a Brach’s candy bar.” But do you know how it all began?

As it turns out, Brach’s is almost 110 years old, as the first store was opened all the way back in 1904. Brach’s was created by a German immigrant by the name of Emil J. Brach. And, believe it or not, the store in 1904 was his second attempt at starting a candy business. His first, in the late 1800s, was a complete failure.

brachs-stars-retro-adBrach’s Booms

The first Brach products were caramels, made in the back of the store and displayed at the front as a way to lure in customers. And lure them in it did! Between 1906 and 1913, the Chicago-based company had to move locations three times to keep up with expansion due to high demand.

It’s no surprise that they were so popular, too! Brach’s has always prided itself on quality, being the first candy company to institute what we might call quality control on candies coming off the line.

Star Quality

Back in the day, Brach shipped his candies by horse, car, mail, and train. So you could have your candies, no matter how near or far you were to the store. That dedication to customer satisfaction is one of the main reasons Brach’s has stayed in business for so long.

The Brachs kept the business in the family for a long time, too, only selling to a non-family buyer in 1966. But the change in ownership didn’t change anything about the taste! Those Chocolate Stars are still sure to be as good as you remember.

brachs-candy-companyToday, Brach’s abandoned factory has some film credit fame to its name, as it became Gotham Hospital in the 2008 movie, The Dark Knight. Cool, right? And since you can’t make delicious confections in a decaying building, you can rest assured knowing that your Brach’s candies are made safely in Texas by company Farley’s & Sathers.

Brach’s is truly a company for the ages. What started as a niche has exploded into a huge candy empire, reaching sweet tooths, everywhere.

Source Material:

http://www.candyblog.net/blog/item/brachs_milk_chocolate_stars

http://americanurbex.com/wordpress/?p=779

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brach’s

Image Sources:

http://americanurbex.com/wordpress/?p=779

http://www.flickr.com/photos/jon_williamson/4394507133/

What’s a Cordial Cherry, Anyway?

Thursday, December 12th, 2013 by Jessica Prokop

cherry-cordials-inventedA Cordial Past

Cordialed cherries have always been a huge hit around the holidays. They’re sweet and perfectly festive- a treat normally reserved for this time of year. But did you realize just how old the method of cordialing is? If not, let’s just say that it’s a little older than you may be expecting.

Cordials for the Heart

In fact, cordials started being made hundreds of years ago, during the Renaissance. They were originally made for medicinal purposes, as the strong flavor was thought to promote health. The meaning of the word itself betrays earlier thoughts that cordials were good for the heart, as “cor” means heart in Latin.

First produced in Italy, this heart-helping drink slowly spread its influence throughout all of Europe. And, over time, this purely medicinal beverage became something of a social-statement, as cordials evolved into what we know today as liquors.

Cordials and Candy

Liquors are often the perfect remedy to a cold winters night, so it’s no surprise that home cooks soon began soaking their fruits in the stuff! What could be more delicious and practical than liquor that you can both drink and make candy with? Our forefathers really knew what they were doing.

chocolate-covered-cherries-cordial-with-cream-2Generations of cordial recipes have been passed down over the years, and many families still make their own, today. Cherries tend to be the most popular cordialed fruit, as the cherry lends itself well to soaking and then being smothered in chocolate. But cordialing takes time- months in fact, to wait for the fruit to sufficiently imbibe itself with the delicious liquor it’s soaking in. And who wants to wait for that? So if waiting is not quite your thing, check out Brach’s Villa Cherries. They might be just what you need to remind yourself of holidays of old.

This year, treat yourself and your loved ones to a taste that has almost outlasted the test of time. Be sure to add cordialed cherries to your shopping list.

Image Sources:

Sources:

Facebook Exclusive Giveaway

Saturday, October 26th, 2013 by Jessica Prokop

fans-connectHelp us reach 10,000 Fans!

After over 85 years in the candy business, we finally have over 8,500 wonderful Facebook fans! We need you to help us pass the 10K mark!

This is an exclusive event just for our Facebook Fans, so if you’re not one yet, get in on the action.

The Number of Prizes is Up to You!

We want to get as many fans as possible by midnight on Halloween. As long as we pass 10,000 fans, we’ll give away 10 prizes to new Facebook fans and 10 prizes to any fans who share our Facebook posts. After we hit 10K, we’ll add an extra prize for every 500 new fans!

It’s super easy!

Become a Fan.
Tell your Friends.
Get Chances to Save & Win!

Prize Winners & New Contest

Sunday, October 20th, 2013 by Jessica Prokop

With all the candy contests we have around here, it only makes sense that we’d end up with some unclaimed prizes in our candy warehouse. These free treats belong in your hands (well, if you’re a lucky winner) so now is the time to stake your claim. We’ve re-sent prize notifications to our winners, but this is the one place to find all the winners all at once.

Here’s Your Next Chance to Win!

utz-pretzels-contest-3 copy

Just tell us your favorite Halloween story.

We just got these huge 2-POUND gift boxes of Utz Pretzels covered with milk and white chocolate. The only thing that makes sense is to give one away!

It’s free to enter! Just post your story in the comments, Tweet it at us @4candyfavorites.com, or post it on our Facebook wall.

Retro Candy Case Contest

Treasure chest-originalOur Retro Case of Old Fashioned Candy is boxed up and ready to go! But first someone had to count all those candies! It turns out that only one person’s guess was right on the nose.

That was Debi Jones with 386!

Since one person doesn’t amount to a pool of winners, we’ll be sending mystery prizes to these close guessers.

387 – Marie Rindsig Steffen
387 – Wayne Kenworthy
384 – Nancy Sewing
389 – Tim McBride
389 – Denise Thorhill

Just send your shipping address to jessica@candyfavorites.com to claim your prize.

Fort Knox Gold Bar Caption Contest

fort-knox-chocolateThe winner of our Giant Fort Knox Chocolate Bar is:

“I didn’t win the lottery, but …I got a solid chocolate bar that is so yummy I have to keep it in Fort Knox !!!

Diane Casasnovas

Here are all our favorite runners up!

“Today on Americas Most Wanted…authorities are searching for this man. He made off with the most valuable gold bar at Fort Knox.”

Amy Airhart Rodriguez

“They don’t know this is an empty wrapper, I already ate the chocolate.”

Sue Derby

“Don’t Knox it until you try it!”

Emily Waszak Florence

“Millionaire Chocoholic looking for another Chocoholic to melt together.”

Kim Nash

“If I could just find my 5 pound jar of peanut butter……”

Melanie Black Little

“It’s bullion, no bull!”

Margaret Morrison

“Gold Would Only Weigh Me Down, But Chocolate Lifts My Spirits Up.”

Steve Dadolf

candy-experiments-mailing-coverCandy Experiments Books

Back in June we were super excited about the fun new book Candy Experiments. We’ve still got a few signed copies of the book on our shelves, and we want some kids (or maybe even grown ups) to have some educational fun with them.

Send us your mailing address if you’re:

  • Andrea
  • Brandi B
  • @glennieglennie

Candy History: Valomilk

Thursday, October 10th, 2013 by Jessica Prokop

The first Valomilk candy cup was created in Kansas by the Sifers company in 1931. The Sifers company had gotten its start by making hard penny candy and then moved on to boxed chocolates and 5-cent candy bars. Like most great inventions, the first Valomilk was the product of a happy accident (serendipity, you might say).
valomilk-logo2

Making a Marshmallow Mess

At that time, the vanilla used to make marshmallows had a lot more alcohol in it than it does today. When a candy maker added too much vanilla, it would prevent the marshmallow from setting properly. Fortunately, when life handed Sifers a batch of runny marshmallow and some chocolate, they made Valomilk!

valomilk-flowingBy containing the gooey marshmallow goodness inside a milk chocolate cup, the candy makers combined incredible flavors and prevented a big mess — at least until someone bit into a candy cup.

Valomilks were first sold in the Midwest and were made up of 2 ounces of marshmallow in one chocolate cup. Now the same amount of candy is split up into 2 smaller cups, making the treat easier (and cleaner) to eat.

Fighting the Good Fight

Valomilks have now been on shelves for 5 generations, but it wasn’t without a fight. In 1981 the Valomilk factory shut down and this classic candy was nowhere to be found.

Thankfully the great grandson of the company’s founder combined the original copper kettles and the traditional family recipe to begin making Valomilks again in Kansas. They only disappeared for 6 years!

To get Valomilks right, they have to be made by hand, so that’s how they’re still made today — one by one, right here in America.

valomilk-dips

 

Candy History: Oh Henry

Thursday, September 19th, 2013 by Jessica Prokop

oh-henry-vintageThe Oh Henry Bar is a straightforward, delicious candy bar with a somewhat complicated history. As opposed to Snickers that was named after Forrest Mars’ beloved racehorse, no one is 100% certain where the name for Oh Henry came from.

Theories abound but one thing that almost everyone agrees upon is that this is a delicious candy bar and has been for close to 100 years. And no, this candy bar is not named after the baseball great Hank Aaron.

Spark your curiosity? Read on…

Lore has it that the name was derived from that of a randy young man who made frequents visits to the original manufacturers – the Williamson company – less for sugary sweets and more to flirt with the eye candy who worked on the assembly line. This leaves us to assume that the young man’s name was — you guessed it — Henry. But certain proof eludes us.

Perhaps a more credible theory is that the candy bar was named after the owner of the now defunct Peerless Candy company.  The owner’s name was Tom Henry and in a vainglorious move, created the Tom Henry Bar.  It was a short-lived venture as he sold the rights to the candy bar in 1920 to the Williamson Candy who changed the name to Oh Henry.

oh-henry-candy-bar-historyOh Henry was also one of the first examples of “guerilla marketing” as an employee of Williamson Candy Company was determined to make the Oh Henry Bar famous. Lacking the funds to launch a full frontal Madison Avenue advertising campaign, this wily salesman had bumper stickers printed with only two words – Oh Henry. Curiousity didn’t kill the cat and this candy bar quickly made a name for itself.

Things remained much the same for close to 65 years until 1984, when Nestle acquired the rights to distribute Oh Henry in the United States. The candy bar is also sold in Canada but distributed by Hershey with the difference being a “chocately” coating as opposed to milk chocolate.

Candy History: Snickers

Thursday, September 12th, 2013 by Jessica Prokop

What could a horse and a candy bar possibly have in common?

This is a question that candy lovers have pondered for 83 years.

A New Kind of Candy Bar

In 1930, Frank Mars, the father of Forrest Mars, named his candy bar after his beloved horse named Snickers. Ironically, the name of the family farm located in Tennessee was Milky Way. These candy bars stirred a bit of controversy upon their release as they were priced at 20 cents at a time when customers expected candy bars to cost a nickel. The inspiration for the bar wasn’t a candy bar at all, but rather a confection made of nougat, peanut & caramel.

Taking Over the World

SONY DSCLittle did he know that this delicious chocolate and caramel would go on to become the best selling candy bar on planet Earth. At one time, confusion abounded as this delicious bar was originally called the Marathon Bar in the United Kingdom. The name was changed to be consistent worldwide, but the Snickers/Marathon confusion continues. In the UK, if someone mentions a Marathon bar, they could be talking about the early Snickers, or the now-discontinued bar best imitated by Cadbury’s Curly Wurly. To make things even more complex, Mars now markets a “Marathon” branded version of the Snickers bar as an energy bar.

Not Going Anywhere for a While

Snickers is the best selling candy bar in the world, accounting for over $2 billion dollars’ worth of annual sales for M&M Mars. Its success is largely attributable to some epic marketing campaigns, and today’s “You’re Not You When You’re Hungry” campaign is no exception.

In case you were wondering, there are roughly 16 peanuts in every chocolate-and-nougat-packed bar, and Mars packs 100 tons of them into 15 million Snickers bars every day. Over the years, more than
40 variations of the Snickers Bar have been marketed
in various places around the world.